Wildscapes – An Australian Colouring Adventure 

Artist – Stephanie Holm
Publisher – Murdoch Books
Pages – 88

Purchase from The Book Depository. 

Purchase from Amazon.

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Cover
 
Book

At a very appealing 24cm x 24cm, this book is a great size for working on no matter where you are. 

The cover is a heavy cardstock, embellished with Australian wildlife in glossy and metallic print with a limited colour palette.

The book is glue and string bound, meaning that it can stand up to quite a bit of pulling and pushing without any of the pages falling out.

The paper is nice and thick, and feels as though it’s close to cardstock in weight. I experienced no shadowing or bleeding with any fineliners or waterbased markers. I used pencils for my kookaburra image below, and unfortunately found that the paper is not optimal for pencils – although it is lovely and thick, there is a distinct lack of tooth. This just means that it is difficult to achieve more than a few layers of pencil. 

(Edited to add – I only tested Faber Castell Classics, other colourists have had great success with other pencils such as Lyra and Prismacolor)

The images do enter the spine, although I found the spine quite pliable with some use.

 wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness  
wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness 

Images 

The variety of Australain flora and fauna is outstanding. Each page contains a new animal or plant for the colourist to bring to life. 

There is everything from orchids, to finches, to bilbies, to skinks in the pages. 

These are represented in a variety of ways – mandalas made up of gumnuts, a thorny devil watching a bilby, patterned frogs. There is double and single page spreads throughout the book, depending on what you feel like colouring.

There is varied intricacies – some pages may take hours, with many detailed areas, and others may take much less time. There are opportunities to add your own designs to the pages, but for those who dislike this feature, this is easily ignored.

The book contains a handy feature in the back pages, three pages of reptiles, mammals and birds that you may encounter within the pages. This is very helpful when trying to decide colours or just to have a smaller version to add colour to! 

Line thickness remains consistent throughout, moderate lines, which suits the subjects well.

 wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness  
wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness  wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness  

wildscapes art therapy colouring coloring in pencils animal australian australia stephanie holm stress mindfulness
My completed image using Faber Castell Classic Pencils
 
Health

This book takes you on a journey through the Australian wildlife scenes. It’s lovely to flip through and imagine each page brought to life.

I found it very calming to colour the images when I was feeling anxious, as the natural element and simple line designs made it a simple activity to distract me and draw my focus elsewhere.

The line thickness and intricacy means that it may pose a difficulty for vision impaired colourists or those with fine motor difficulties. As always however, please have a look at the images and decide based on your own situation! 

This book has something for everyone – animals, plants, scenes, patterns. Unless you are a diehard patterns only fan, this book will most likely be a delightful experience for you.
If you enjoy this book, have a look at my review of another Australian flora and fauna based book via this link.

   
 

7 thoughts on “Wildscapes – An Australian Colouring Adventure 

  1. Nice review. Thanks. If it wasn’t for the comments on lack of tooth in the paper I’d be very tempted by this book. Good to see the nice fine line work. So often the line work is intrusive.

    Why can’t publishers actually think about the use to which colouring books are put and make them in a suitable format?

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    1. It is lovely artwork. I’ve had some people tell me that other pencils (Lyra, Albrecht Durer and Prismacolor) – particularly softer ones- do work well with the paper. I’ll have to give them a whirl.
      I know, unfortunately I think to some publishers cost is more a factor than usability.

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  2. I’ve only used pencils in mine. It must depend on what sort they are. The best ones seem to be my watercolours (Albrechts) as they’re softer but my Lyras work just as well. The classics I find too hard for my style of colouring, but love their colours. The Staedtlers (blue triangular aquarells) are lovely too.

    Love your reviews 🙂 They’re always informative and genuine. Thank you!

    Like

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